Method and Theory in the Cognitive Sciences of Religion
- The Religious Studies Project

Recorded at the 2015 North American Association for the Study of Religion (NAASR) conference, Robert is interviewed by Tommy Coleman and discusses methodological and theoretical issues within the cognitive sciences of religion.


Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not
- University of Texas, Austin

Robert delivers a compact version of this talk at the “Breaking New Ground in the Science and Religion Dialogue” conference on April 10, 2015.

Robert gave an expanded version of the talk at Seattle Pacific University on September 13, 2013


Are We Predisposed to Believe in Religion More Than Science?
- WNPR

While we may not be "hard-wired" for it, Robert thinks we have a natural disposition to believe in religion more than science. Robert discusses evolution, science, and belief with James Krupa and Connie Bertka on The Colin McEnroe Show from April 29, 2015.

To listen to the podcast, click here
 


The Evolution Revolution in the Study of the Prehistory and the Histories of Religions
Conference on Prosociality in History and Historiography, University of British Columbia

Robert's keynote lecture from October 17, 2014.

            


Ancient Religions and Cognition 2: Transmission
- Senate House, London 

See some of the conference on religious transmission, as well as interviews with Robert and other scholars who attended the meeting.

To watch the video, click here


Placing a Premium on Multidisciplinary Collaboration at the CMBC
- Emory University

Robert is interviewed by Hal Jacobs about the Center for Mind, Brain, and Culture at Emory University.


Robert McCauley on Cognitive Science and Reductionism
- LEVYNA, Masaryk University, Czech Republic

Robert is interviewed by Dimitris Xygalatas concerning models of cross-scientific relations.


"Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not" Book Trailer
- Emory University

Robert McCauley talks about his book Why Religion Is Natural and Science Is Not. His main point is that our minds are better suited to religious belief than to scientific inquiry.